The Builder's Way

Perhaps no one appreciates quality building as much as a builder does. Here's how three of them designed and decorated their own homes.

























Chris Schell liked the community
he built so much that he and his
wife, Lori, bought a home in it.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

The Builder's Way
Perhaps no one appreciates quality building as much as a builder does. Here's how three of them designed and decorated their own homes.

The Design Incubator
As a rule of thumb, homebuilders don't get too attached to the houses they construct.

After all, the point is to create a place somebody else will buy and call home.

But when Chris Schell built an opulent Craftsman-style house at Wolfe Pointe, a fashionable community near Lewes, he became so immersed in the project, it was easy to visualize himself moving in with his wife and two young children.

"I fell in love with the house, so I bought it," he recalls.

With his twin brother, Preston, Schell runs Echelon Homes, a builder of custom luxury residences, and Schell Brothers, a developer of upscale communities.

His own home is a design incubator of sorts, a house that integrates style, craftsmanship and technology in 6,400 square feet of living space that's amenable to both the intimacies of family life and large-scale entertaining.

"The theme was Craftsman Luxury," Schell says. "We used materials that give the home a sense of time and warmth, but with the latest in conveniences."

He believes in building exquisitely detailed homes with the types of amenities that make life easier for the people who live in them-and even their four-footed friends. In the first-floor laundry room, there's a pet shower with a hand-held sprayer, ideal for bathing pooches.

Other conveniences aren't immediately apparent in the flowing and elegant decor. The massive chandelier in the foyer is outfitted with an automated lift and can be easily lowered for cleaning or to change a bulb. A small fridge is tucked into the custom hickory cabinetry in the study. In the master bath, a radiant heating system takes the chill off the stone floor.

"I set it for 5 o'clock in the morning," Schell says. "When I get up at 5:30 to take a shower, the floor is nice and warm."


Tongue-in-groove pine ceilings
reflect the angles of the roofline
and add volume to areas such
as the bedroom.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

In the kitchen, a commercial-style range and double-wall ovens facilitate cooking for a crowd. An iCEBOX mounted under the cabinets provides multiple functions-Internet access, television, DVD and CD player-in a compact screen.

"We use it a lot for recipes," he says.

There's nothing especially high-tech about the dishwasher. But its placement-elevated a foot off the floor-makes it much easier to load.

"This is something we knew seniors would like, but it turns out everyone appreciates not having to bend over to put their plates in the dishwasher," Schell says.

An expansive lower level is dedicated to entertaining. It includes a playroom for kids and a game area for grownup poker.

A cozy sitting room with seating upholstered in soft leather and tapestry-style fabric is instantly transformed into a home theater with the touch of a key pad, as a large screen descends from the ceiling. Wainscoting is padded in woven leather. The upper half of the walls is softened in artfully draped garnet-colored velvet.

The treatment is pragmatic as well as aesthetically pleasing.

"You can have a conversation right outside the room and not hear the movie," Schell says. "It's an incredibly effective way of controlling the sound."

An expansive and glamorous bar was crafted from burled maple and outfitted with such amenities as a dishwasher for glassware, icemaker, wine chiller and under-counter fridge. Each bottle on the bar back is illuminated by a fiber optic light installed in the shelves. The lights can be programmed in various colors-or in a revolving palette of hues.


The bar, made from burled maple, includes
a dishwasher, icemaker, wine chiller and an
under-counter fridge. Each bottle on the bar
back is illuminated by fiber optic light, which
can be programmed in various colors.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

Schell paid special attention to lighting throughout the house, combining recessed lighting, task lighting and ambient illumination, all controlled remotely. The lanterns recessed into arched stone niches in the billiards area were inspired by a castle he visited while traveling through Greece.

"Lighting makes a huge difference, yet isn't terribly expensive," he says.

Schell also emphasized the ceilings on all three levels. A two-story tongue-in-groove ceiling of pine reflects the angles of the roofline above the living room, adding volume to the space. A vaulted knotty pine ceiling in the family room is bolstered with tresses, enhancing the Craftsman vibe. A coffered ceiling in the study gives the room a masculine, clubby feel. On the lower level, 9-foot ceilings are embellished with coffers in contrasting light and dark woods.

"The ceilings feel even higher because of the coffer," he says.

Choosing the right materials and finishes was an essential element in infusing the house with a feeling that is both rustic and refined. The spindles on a sweeping central staircase were crafted from wrought iron. The rare granite that tops the counters and tub deck in the master bath is exuberantly patterned in verdant green and earth tones.

"This granite was taken from an old river bed, so it has different stones in it," Schell notes.

On the exterior of the house, wood and stone are combined in the tradition of Craftsman architecture, a style rooted in the Arts and Crafts movement of the 19th century, which celebrated natural materials and superior workmanship. A broad front porch is defined by weighty wood columns with stone bases. The shutters are unpainted pine with wrought-iron hinges. A barrel-vaulted ceiling of tongue-in-groove pine defines an entry marked by massive double doors and transom windows.

Behind the house, a sweeping multi-tier deck is made from ipe, a Brazilian wood known for extreme durability.

"It's really hard," Schell says. "You have to put it together with a special drill because the nails just bend."

A gas-fueled stone fire pit surrounded by built-in seating enables the family to enjoy the deck year-round.


The kitchen features a commercial-style range
and double wall ovens. An iCEBOX, mounted
under the cabinets, provides Internet access,
television and a DVD and CD player.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

"We turn it on for our Christmas party, and everyone seems to gravitate toward that space," he says.

A pergola defines an outdoor kitchen equipped with a built-in 50-inch stainless steel gas grill, sink, refrigerator and granite countertops.

Family and friends can dine on an adjacent screened porch, outfitted with retractable screens that allow the Schells to readily create an open-air connection with the deck.

"One of the things we like best about this house is the outdoor spaces are just as comfortable as the indoors," he says.




Ron and Donna Coffin's three-story home
provides a panoramic view of the Lewes coast.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

The Builder's Itch
Custom contractor Ron Coffin typically builds houses from the ground up.

But the inspiration for his home was plucked from the sky.

Coffin was looking for a place to keep his boat when a canal-front property in Lewes became available.

He surveyed the lot on foot-then decided to get a bird's eye perspective.

"Ronnie got in a lift to see what the views would be," his wife, Donna, recalls.

When he reached a height the equivalent of three stories-the highest level buildings can be constructed by law in Lewes-Coffin was tingling, taking in dazzling views of Roosevelt Inlet and Broadkill Beach.

"You could see all the way to Prime Hook-and then some," he says.

Though he was totally content in his nearby cottage, Coffin was captivated by the prospect of constructing a new house that would maximize the waterfront setting, as well as the jaw-dropping vistas.

"I got the builder's itch," he says.


The gourmet kitchen on the third floor is
outfitted with a large island for casual dining
or for those who want to visit with the cook.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

Coffin had renovated several homes for his family over the years, including a residence in North Carolina when he briefly relocated there, a big house in Millsboro he expanded multiple times, and a bungalow in Lewes he transformed into a two-story cottage.

The new house was inspired by the classic homes found in the historic district of Charleston, South Carolina, a style that combines large windows, gracious columns, and multiple porches and balconies. He chose cedar shakes for the siding, in keeping with the beach setting. In all, the house is 4,700 square feet, with an additional 2,000 square feet of decking.

With the couple's first three homes, Ron pretty much took charge of the design and the amenities. This time around, Donna came up with her own wish list.

"I've always enjoyed my homes, and I love to decorate," she says. "I think a person's surroundings are very important."

Her plan included reserving the second floor for the Coffins' three children, who were then teenagers.

"Every child had his or her own bedroom with a private bath and walk-in closet," she recalls.

The space also included an open-air deck, as well as a den where the teens could hang out with their friends.

After seven years in the house, the Coffins are now empty nesters, and the one-time teen haven is now expansive guest quarters. The couple recently welcomed their first grandchild into the family and frequently host extended visits from friends and relatives.

"We still have the trundle beds the kids used when their friends stayed over, which comes in handy when you have lots of company," Donna says.

An elevator zips groceries and other supplies to the gourmet kitchen on the third floor. Donna is an accomplished and enthusiastic cook, so she outfitted her kitchen with granite countertops, a commercial-style cooktop with a griddle, a high-capacity fridge and a pair of wall ovens. There's a large island for casual dining or seating for folks who want to keep the cook company.

The kitchen is open to a large gathering area from which the Coffins can see the ocean on a clear day. A cozy table and chairs by the window on the opposite side of the space offers a view of charter boats going up and down the canal.


The formal dining room is
flanked by large Italian pottery
jars that once held olive oil.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

"Except for the coldest days in winter, there's something interesting to see," Donna says.

There's also a large table for formal dining. It is flanked by enormous pottery jars imported from Italy that once held olive oil. That European feeling is echoed in the conversation area, where large sofas are upholstered in a comfy, tapestry-style fabric. The space is grounded by wide, random-width white oak floors treated only with a simple finishing oil to promote a sense of age.

Donna commissioned a decorative artist to paint the walls and ceiling in a mottled, Old World finish reminiscent of aged Tuscan plaster. The artist also created a patinated replica of a centuries-old map, complete with crinkles, and mounted it on doors set into the wall above the fireplace.

"It hides the television," Donna says. "I would rather look at something artistic than a big black box."

Both the Coffins are aficionados of art and Donna is fond of collecting antiques. A pair of pottery jugs, discovered at an antiques shop in Key West, was recovered from a shipwreck. She bought the vintage woven-wood eel pot at auction.

The third floor also includes a sumptuous master suite, where the Coffins awake each day to vistas of the sea and sky. Donna furnished the space in Chinese Chippendale-style furniture with bamboo-inspired carving that conjures images of world travel.

A luxurious master bath-one of six bathrooms in the house-features his and her vanities, a large shower and a soaking tub.

On the first floor, a compact summer kitchen is accessible to the patio. It's the ideal place to boil crabs. When it comes to cracking them, the Coffins put a plywood top on the billiards table to create a massive surface for serving food. A screened porch allows diners to enjoy a repast without interference from insects.

"I didn't want to be banging on crabs on a table over an Oriental rug," Donna says. "This is the perfect solution when we have a lot of people over."


The master bath, one of six
bathrooms in the home, features
a soaking tub.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

"We're down-home folks, very casual people," notes Ron.

The Coffins and their friends enjoy putting their feet up on the red-brick patio that faces the canal. Speckled orange and silver koi slice through the water in the fish pond, hoping for a treat from visitors.

A gifted gardener, Donna enjoys colorful flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. She has surrounded the patio with hot pink hibiscus, sunshine yellow coreopsis and vivid orange lilies. Her dahlias produce blooms the size of dinner plates. Thanks to Lewes' moderate climate, the tubers overwinter outdoors.

As much as they enjoy their home, the Coffins also have fun thinking about how they would design their next one. That's an occupational pastime with contractors.

"We'd like to build-just one more time," Ron says.

 




Jeff Stapen and Barkley
discovered a diamond in the
rough in Centreville.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

A Happy Restoration
Jeff Stapen was on an expedition of sorts, making his way through a dense grove of bamboo, hacking a path through a jungle of vines and trees in the unlikely wilds of Centreville.

Just ahead was a shabby duplex with a sagging, primitive addition. Inside, the units were equally rundown, with antiquated baths and cramped rooms.

Stapen looked around-and liked what he saw.

"This house was a diamond in the rough," he says.

Stapen is a custom builder who has constructed new homes and additions with craftsman-like precision. He also has restored structures, meticulously returning them to their former luster while making a few improvements.

But he started his career in the insurance business, evaluating repairs on homes that had been heavily damaged through flood or fire. That experience instilled him with a keen sense of vision of what a house could be-and how to achieve quality, authentic results.


Raised-panel kitchen cabinets are
made from salvaged wood finished
with lemony milk paint to enhance
the vintage look.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

"The insurance company taught me how to put things back to the way they were originally," Stapen says. "I learned to see beyond the mess."

His strategy was to restore the house, built in 1910, to the purpose established by its first owners. He would live in one half and rent out the other half.

"It was always a duplex, right down to the divided basement," he says.

To stabilize the house as well as improve its appearance, Stapen tore off a tired asphalt shingle roof, then replaced it with cedar shakes that were appropriate to the period.

A generation earlier, a previous owner had sheathed the duplex in aluminum siding. Based on a little house detective work, Stapen determined that the original siding was likely intact and in good condition.

"There was a big drive in the 1970s, selling aluminum siding up and down Route 52," he says. "We looked underneath it and found this nice cedar lap siding."

Removing the siding revealed detailed dentil molding on the front porch, as well as elegantly carved cap molding above the windows and doors. He painted the trim in crisp white and the siding in a deep tan that is compatible with the fieldstone foundation.


A furniture maker designed and built the dining
table, which includes carved legs and a rustic top
of reclaimed wood.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

Inside, the central staircase leading to the second floor didn't need much work. The duplex also retained its five-panel wood doors. The only door Stapen had to add was for a powder room he tucked into the first floor.

He restored the existing pine floors, removing three coats of paint and two of stain to reveal the grain, giving the space an instant sense of age and character.

For the kitchen floor, he chose 20 inch-by-20 inch quarry tiles. The dimensions make the space look larger and the rugged surface stands up to traffic from Barkley, his Labrador retriever.

"Barkley and I have been together a long time, so it was important that everything in my home be dog friendly," he says.

As a man who embraces craftsmanship, Stapen marveled at the plaster, mixed with horsehair by early 20th century artisans, as he took down a wall between a snug living room and a jot of a dining room to create a single gathering space.

"I like the openness," he says. "Even though this house is small, it's open, and you can easily see from front to back."


The deck overlooks a field used to graze cattle.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

He commissioned a furniture maker from Pennsylvania to design and build a large dining table with carved and detailed legs and a rustic top of reclaimed wood. Surrounded by custom chairs crafted in farmhouse style, the table is big enough to accommodate company at mealtimes-or serve as impromptu office space.

The furniture maker fabricated the raised-panel cabinets in the kitchen from salvaged wood, as well. Apothecary drawers and lemony milk paint enhance the vintage look. Stapen specified glass doors on the overheard cupboards, in keeping with the light and airy ambience he wanted to achieve.

For the countertops and deep sink he chose soapstone, a nonporous, naturally occurring material. Charcoal with white flecks, soapstone isn't shiny like polished granite or marble, and it gains personality over time, along with a few dings, which the homeowner can readily sand out-or opt to keep.

"I wanted it to look rough with the joints exposed," Stapen says.

He asked friends for input on his color selections, finally selecting a palette inspired by the earth. The kitchen walls are painted in soft terra cotta. Sandy beige sets the tone in the living and dining rooms.


Stapen chose soapstone for
bathroom countertops.
Photograph by Thom Thompson
www.thomthompson.com

Stapen didn't forget the creature comforts of life in the 21st century. He installed a plasma TV and a surround-sound speaker system, -a total guy thing," he says. A sectional sofa provides casual seating in front of the fireplace.

The second floor was reconfigured to accommodate a master bedroom, a guest room, closets and a hall bath with soapstone counters.

Stapen razed the wobbly, two-story shed addition on the back of the duplex, relocating laundry rooms to the dual basements. He then constructed spacious, two-tier open-air balconies that offer a vista of grazing cattle.

"It's an extremely peaceful setting, relaxing on the deck and looking out over green fields," he says. "It's a much more pleasant view than a bunch of overgrown bamboo."

For Stapen, the location also offers an ideal blend of small shops and friendly residents in an historic oasis nestled in verdant hills. So far, at least one neighbor has been inspired to remove the aluminum siding from his home and restore the clapboards beneath.

"I love the whole Centreville village experience," Stapen says.

His work isn't restricted to residential restoration and vintage styling. His projects include new construction, including a stone and brick barn, and such undertakings as a cool, mid-century house.

"We're actually making it more contemporary," he says.

His own home is a small space that has inspired big thoughts. When he builds his next house, Stapen will incorporate architectural elements he enjoys in the duplex-but on a grander scale.

"I love wood, exposed brick, that great craftsman style," he says. "It's a classic that never gets old."

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January 2017

January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
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Telephone: 302-654-8638
Website »

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January 14, 15, 16 – Saturday, Sunday, and Monday – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Invention Convention Lights, camera, action! This year’s Invention Convention features hands-on video...

Cost: $8 for adults, $6 for children between 4 and 14, and free for children under 4 a

Where:
Hagley Museum
201 Hagley Creek Road
Wilmington, DE  19807
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Sponsor: Hagley Museum
Telephone: (302) 65802400 x 238
Contact Name: Jessica Eisenbrey
Website »

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Belly Dance Classes with Zahra Beginner & intermediate classes open to teens and adults Sundays in January starting Jan 8th Beginner: 2:30-3:30 p.m. Intermediate: 1 - 2 p.m (must get...

Cost: $15-$42

Where:
Take the Lead Studio
320 Lantana Drive
Hockessin , DE  19711
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Sponsor: Take the Lead
Contact Name: Zahra
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Join Rachel Binkley of Rocker Soaps + Herbals for a fun and information filled class. We will make soap, learn how to make a soap recipe and get tips and techniques to make it easier for you at...

Cost: 40

Where:
Elements of Nutrition
4710 Kirkwood Hwy
Wilmington, DE  19808
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Sponsor: Rocker Soaps + Herbals
Telephone: 302-544-0391
Contact Name: Rachel Binkley
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Come give curling a try! At this 2-hour intro-to-curling event we'll provide a basic lesson then coach you through a mini-game.  Whether you just want to cross #curling off your bucket list or...

Cost: $35

Where:
The Pond Ice Arena
101 John Campbell Rd
Newark, DE  19711
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Sponsor: Diamond State Curling Club
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The Rehoboth Beach Film Society will present its popular What Makes Us Tick? program during the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend, January 13-15. This analytical film and discussion series...

Cost: $9 - $10

Where:
Cinema Art Theater
17701 Dartmouth Drive, #2
Lewes, DE  19958
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Sponsor: Rehoboth Beach Film Society
Telephone: 302-645-9095
Contact Name: Jeri Kaplan
Website »

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BROKEN ARROW: A NEIL YOUNG TRIBUTE Broken Arrow delivers the music of Neil Young; both the rockin' electric guitar driven favorites and the more country flavored classics with pedal steel and...

Cost: $12 ADV- $14 DOS

Where:
World Cafe Live Wilmington
500 N Market St
Wilmington, DE  19801
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Telephone: 215-222-1400
Contact Name: MP Intern
Website »

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Learn how climate change affects our world with hands-on activities that can relate to explorers of all ages. Arctic Adventure and Rainforest Explorer visitors can take on the role of an Arctic...

Cost: Adults: $9 Children (3-17): $7 Seniors (60+): $8 Under 3: FREE Members: FREE

Where:
Delaware Museum of Natural History
4840 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE  19807
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Telephone: 302-658-9111
Website »

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When the kids have a day off but the parents don’t, let them spend the day off of school doing something really cool…having fun at DMNH! Enjoy games, crafts, activities, and even a hot dog...

Cost: $20 for Members, $25 for Non-Members.

Where:
Delaware Museum of Natural History
4840 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE  19807
View map »


Website »

More information

January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
View map »


Telephone: 302-654-8638
Website »

More information

Science is for everyone! Join us for hands on crafts and activities that highlight science contributions to natural history from scientists all around the world. Learn how YOU can make a difference...

Cost: Free with Admission

Where:
Delaware Museum of Natural History
4840 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE  19807
View map »


Telephone: 130-265-89111
Website »

More information

January 14, 15, 16 – Saturday, Sunday, and Monday – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Invention Convention Lights, camera, action! This year’s Invention Convention features hands-on video...

Cost: $8 for adults, $6 for children between 4 and 14, and free for children under 4 a

Where:
Hagley Museum
201 Hagley Creek Road
Wilmington, DE  19807
View map »


Sponsor: Hagley Museum
Telephone: (302) 65802400 x 238
Contact Name: Jessica Eisenbrey
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
View map »


Telephone: 302-654-8638
Website »

More information

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30AM-12:00PM Fall session: Thursday, Dec 1st thru Thursday, December 15th Winter session: Tuesday, January 17th thru Thursday, March 30th   Drop in on Nature is...

Cost: see description

Where:
The Annex
501 Chandler Mill Rd
Kennett Square, PA  19348
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Sponsor: The Land Conservancy
Telephone: 610-347-0347 ext.104
Website »

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East Coast Garden Center Indoor Farmers Market Nov 8, 2016 - April 11, 2017  11 am- 2 pm 25 vendors Location:  East Coast Garden Center 30366 Cordrey Rd Millsboro, DE 19966 302-945-3489

Cost: frr

Where:
East Coast Garden Center
30366 Cordrey Rd
Millsboro, DE  19966
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Sponsor: East Coast Garden Center
Telephone: 302-945-3489
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East Coast Garden Center Indoor Farmer's Marke 25 vendors

Cost: Free

Where:
East Coast Garden Center
30366 Cordrey Rd
Millsboro, DE  19966
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Telephone: 302-945-3489
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A four-week series of ballroom dancing classes taught by teachers from the BlueBallroom. Tuesdays starting Jan. 10. Classes are $30 a lesson for Non-Members. Non-Member slots are limited. For...

Cost: $30

Where:
University and Whist Club
805 N Broom St
Wilmington, DE  19806
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The Cinema & the Arts film series proudly presents a screening of the documentary ART BASTARD on  Tuesday, January 17, 7:00 pm, at Cinema Art Theater, 17701 Dartmouth Drive in Dartmouth Plaza,...

Cost: $9

Where:
Cinema Art Theater
17701 Dartmouth Drive, #2
Lewes, DE  19958
View map »


Sponsor: Rehoboth Beach Film Society
Telephone: 302-645-9095
Contact Name: Jeri Kaplan
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
View map »


Telephone: 302-654-8638
Website »

More information

The Division of Public Health offers its annual free flu vaccination event in the Legislative Hall Library, ground floor, 411 Legislative Ave., Dover, DE, on January 18, 2017, from 11:00 a.m. to...

Cost: FREE

Where:
Legislative Hall Library
411 Legislative Ave.
Dover, DE  19901
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Sponsor: Division of Public Health
Telephone: 800-282-8672
Website »

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Do you want to learn how to make soap? This is your chance! Join me for a fun and informative class @ Liquid Alchemy. I will teach you how to create your own recipe and the in-and-outs of soap...

Cost: 45

Where:
Liquid Alchemy
28 Brookside Dr.
, DE  19804
View map »


Sponsor: Rocker Soaps + Herbals
Telephone: 302-544-0391
Contact Name: Rachel Binkley
Website »

More information

Do you want to learn how to make soap? This is your chance! Join me for a fun and informative class @ Liquid Alchemy. I will teach you how to create your own recipe and the in-and-outs of soap...

Cost: 45.00

Where:
Liquid Alchemy
28 Brookside Dr.
Wilmington, DE  19804
View map »


Sponsor: Rocker Soaps + Herbals
Telephone: 302-544-0391
Contact Name: Rachel Binkley
Website »

More information

Show More...
Show Less...

January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
View map »


Telephone: 302-654-8638
Website »

More information

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30AM-12:00PM Fall session: Thursday, Dec 1st thru Thursday, December 15th Winter session: Tuesday, January 17th thru Thursday, March 30th   Drop in on Nature is...

Cost: see description

Where:
The Annex
501 Chandler Mill Rd
Kennett Square, PA  19348
View map »


Sponsor: The Land Conservancy
Telephone: 610-347-0347 ext.104
Website »

More information

Guest speakers Patty Dailey-Lewis, executive director of the Beau Biden Foundation, and Delaware Family Court commissioner Loretta Young will discuss how participation in social media can too...

Cost: Free

Where:
Wilmington University - Doberstein Admissions Ctr.
320 N DuPont Highway
New Castle, DE  19805
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Sponsor: Wilmington University College of Social & Behavioral Sciences
Telephone: 302-295-1164
Contact Name: Dr. Johanna Bishop
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Thursdays from 4:00PM-5:30PM Fall session: December 1st, 8th and 15th Winter session: Starts January 19th, every other Thursday until March 30th This program is based entirely outdoors and is...

Cost: Cost: $30 for TLC members / $40 for non-members

Where:
Bucktoe Creek Preserve
432 Sharp Rd
Avondale, PA  19311
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Sponsor: The Land Conservancy
Telephone: 610-347-0347 ext.104
Website »

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The 3rd Place and Bike Lane Cafe along with WestSide Grows and Delaware Permaculture bring you the West 7th Street Bazaar.  Happening EVERY 3rd Thursday of the month from January through May,...

Cost: Free Admission

Where:
The 3rd Place
1139 W. 7th Street
Wilmington, DE  19805
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Sponsor: West Side Grows
Telephone: 302-690-9459
Contact Name: Delaware Permaculture
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January 19 – Thursday – 6:30 p.m. Research Seminar: Amyrs Williams (Wesleyan University) – Reimagining the Modern Farm The seminar is open to the public and is based on a paper that is...

Cost: $0

Where:
Copeland Room, Hagley Library
298 Buck Road
Wilmington, DE  19807
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Sponsor: Hagley Museum & Library
Telephone: (302) 65802400
Contact Name: Carol Lockman
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The Resident Ensemble Players, Delaware’s professional acting company performing at the University of Delaware, presents The Bells by Theresa Rebeck. During the great Yukon gold rush of the...

Cost: $15 - $30

Where:
Thompson Theatre, Roselle Center for the Arts
110 Orchard Rd.
Newark, DE  19716
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Sponsor: Resident Ensemble Players
Telephone: (302) 831-2204
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HIGH & MIGHTY BRASS BAND There’s a reason that musical trailblazers from Galactic to DJ Logic have recently chosen to collaborate with High and Mighty Brass Band! and legends such as Dr. John,...

Cost: $15

Where:
World Cafe Live Wilmington
500 N Market St
Wilmington, DE  19801
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Telephone: 215-222-1400
Contact Name: MP Intern
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January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
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Telephone: 302-654-8638
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Formed in 1992, Splintered Sunlight quickly became the most popular Grateful Dead Tribute band in the Philadelphia area, gaining praise from Dead Heads and Non Heads alike. Since that time,...

Cost: $10

Where:
World Cafe Live At The Queen
500 N Market St.
Wilmington, DE  19801
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Meeting every Friday, Bayhealth Kent General Hospital, 640 s. State Street, Dover, 7:30 pm., Private Dining Room #3 in the basement. For those who have, or think they may have a gambling problem....

Cost: 0.00

Where:
Bayhealth Kent General Hospital
640 S. State Street
Private Dining Room #3
Dover, DE  19901
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Telephone: 800-855-2CALLGA
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Ah, typecasting—the baritone is always the bad guy! In Devils, Drunks & Dastardly Dudes, we’ll go on an operatic journey of men behaving badly. We’ll add a tenor to the mix, too… but we...

Cost: $29-$59

Where:
OperaDelaware Studio
4 South Poplar St.
Wilmington, DE  19801
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Sponsor: OperaDelaware
Telephone: 302-442-7809
Contact Name: Mary Wilcosky
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The Resident Ensemble Players, Delaware’s professional acting company performing at the University of Delaware, presents The Bells by Theresa Rebeck. During the great Yukon gold rush of the...

Cost: $15 - $30

Where:
Thompson Theatre, Roselle Center for the Arts
110 Orchard Rd.
Newark, DE  19716
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Sponsor: Resident Ensemble Players
Telephone: (302) 831-2204
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Amateur and professional creators from the Wilmington community and beyond will sketch, paint and sculpt side-by-side with DCAD students, alumni, faculty and staff as nude and costumed male...

Cost: $30 per person

Where:
Delaware College of Art and Design
600 N. Market St.
Wilmington, DE  19081
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Sponsor: Delaware College of Art and Design
Telephone: 302-622-8000 x 123
Contact Name: Mark Tajzler
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January 3 - 28  “Winter Group Show” Rotating Group Show features a variety of art in different styles and media. Custom Framing & Gift Certificates are always available. Gallery Hours:...

Cost: free

Where:
The Station Gallery
3922 Kennett Pike
Greenville, DE  19807
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Telephone: 302-654-8638
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From foxes and beavers to cats and dogs, all mammals benefit from open space! Discover the signs of mammals in winter and learn about human impact on mammal habitat and population survival. Join...

Cost: FREE for TLC members / $10 for non-members

Where:
Bucktoe Creek Preserve
432 Sharp Rd
Avondale, PA  19311
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Sponsor: The Land Conservancy
Telephone: 610-347-0347 ext.104
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The Rehoboth Beach Film Society and the Cape Henlopen Educational Foundation are proud to present The Metropolitan Opera’s live broadcast of Charles Gounod’s ROMÉO ET JULIETTE on Saturday,...

Cost: $15 - $25

Where:
Cape Henlopen High School Theater
1250 Kings Highway
Lewes, DE  19958
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Sponsor: Rehoboth Beach Film Society
Telephone: 130-264-59095
Contact Name: Jeri Kaplan
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The Rehoboth Beach Film Society announces the next play in the exciting series of National Theatre Live screenings. National Theatre Live is a groundbreaking project that presents the best of...

Cost: $18-$20

Where:
Cinema Art Theater
17701 Dartmouth Drive, #2
Lewes, DE  19958
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Sponsor: Rehoboth Beach Film Society
Telephone: 302-645-9095
Contact Name: Jeri Kaplan
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Coastal Concerts in downtown Lewes will host a presentation by one of the most recognized, honored and versatile musicians in the world, the legendary two-time Grammy Award-winning clarinetist...

Cost: $30. Ages 10-18 and one adult per youth.

Where:
Bethel United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall
Fourth & Market Streets
Lewes, DE  19958
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Sponsor: Coastal Concerts, Inc.
Telephone: 888-212-6458
Contact Name: Edna Ellett
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Ovations Dinner Theatre hosts an interactive Mafia Murder Mystery dinner. Ticket includes a 3-course Italian dinner and the performance. Tickets are $45 for Non-Members and Non-Member seating is...

Cost: 45

Where:
Ballroom at University and Whist Club
805 N. Broom St.
Wilmington, DE  19806
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Bethany Beach – When local businessman Tim Hill was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (“ALS”) in 2014, he set on a mission to help other people who were diagnosed with...

Cost: $20 General Admission

Where:
Frankford Fire Hall
7 Main Street
Frankford, DE  19945
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The Resident Ensemble Players, Delaware’s professional acting company performing at the University of Delaware, presents The Bells by Theresa Rebeck. During the great Yukon gold rush of the...

Cost: $15 - $30

Where:
Thompson Theatre, Roselle Center for the Arts
110 Orchard Rd.
Newark, DE  19716
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Sponsor: Resident Ensemble Players
Telephone: (302) 831-2204
Website »

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AM RADIO Have you ever perked up when the radio plays a song that first hit popular stations when you were young? Do you turn the volume up to obnoxious levels and sing along? Music can bring us...

Cost: $10 + FEES

Where:
World Cafe Live Wilmington
500 N Market St
Wilmington, DE  19801
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Telephone: 215-222-1400
Contact Name: MP Intern
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