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Create a Man Cave in Delaware: Financial Adviser Fred Dawson of Club Phred Built a Nightclub in the Basement of his Yorklyn Home

He’s gotta have it ... And if “you” gotta have a man cave, you may as well class it up.



Since prehistoric times, man has searched for the perfect cave.

Thousands of years later, that primitive urge remains as the male of the species looks for a sanctuary where he can devour flesh, quaff fermented grain—and play rock ’n’ roll real loud.

“My man cave means the world to me,” says Fred Dawson, who has transformed the 1,700-square-foot lower level of his home into Guy Land. “This is where I get back to my roots.”

Dawson found this ornate bar in Atlanta. His plan was to create that manly feel by mimicking an English pub. Mission accomplished. photograph by Jared CastaldiFor him, that means music. A successful financial adviser, Dawson also plays the Hammond B3 organ in the band Club Phred, rehearsing classic rock of the 1960s and ’70s in the man cave every Tuesday night.

He looked long and hard for a suitable space to jam in before building a sprawling custom home in an upscale development in Yorklyn.

“I had a very specific wish list and realized the only way to get everything on it was to start from scratch,” he says.

The man cave is Dawson’s interpretation of an invitation-only nightclub. Sofas and comfy chairs frame the space on three sides. Clusters of tables and chairs form intimate groupings where guests can enjoy food and drink and groove to the music.

A black, floor-to-ceiling curtain is the band’s dramatic backdrop. “The curtain is very stagey, very nightclubby, just the look I was going for,” he says.

The original plans mandated a custom-built bar. But while Dawson was traveling in Atlanta, he spied a wooden bar ornately carved with stained glass accents. It looked like it was lifted out of an English pub.

The fearless leader  rocks his Hammond B3. photograph by Jared CastaldiIt struck him as the ideal spot for the blokes at home to raise a pint.

“I immediately called the builder and told him to stop work, that I had found a bar and was shipping it home,” he recalls.

Although space is a male domain, women are welcome to enter the cave at party time.

“I love and respect women,” Dawson says. “I’m even married to a woman.”

His wife, Louise, approaches interior design with the same enthusiasm her husband has for music. She took charge of decorating the rest of the house, including a Southwest-flavored family room with an equestrian theme.

“But the man cave is all Fred,” she says. “He came up with everything.”

A man’s wall can depict a lifetime of memories. photograph by Jared CastaldiIndeed. There is a walk-out entrance where the band’s van backs up, the better to roll the Hammond B3—all 480 pounds of it—out of the man cave for road trips. Outside, two runners of open-topped pavers are set into the ground, providing a pathway for the van without disturbing the lush lawn.

There is a wooden dance floor in front of the stage, which is illuminated by a track of theater lighting. Ceiling fans keep the air circulating. Wiring for the sound system and other gadgetry is hidden above the acoustical ceiling panels.

“This space is extraordinarily insulated,” he says. “In 11 years, my neighbors have never heard a sound.”

Get the Look
  • Indulge your passion Fred Dawson’s man cave revolves around live rock ’n’ roll, with designated places for playing, listening and dancing.
     
  • Show off your trophies In Dawson’s man cave, that includes drum heads autographed by music legends like Ringo Starr and Roger Daltrey. Your bowling statues are acceptable. And do show off that Salesman of the Millennium plaque.
     
  • Raise the bar The focal point in Dawson’s man cave is an elaborately carved bar with stained glass that might have been transported straight from an English pub.
     
  • Hide the techie stuff Cables and wires for audio equipment are tucked away inside a drop ceiling, where they’re out of sight but can be readily accessed for upgrades and maintenance.
     
  • Draw the curtains A black, floor-to-ceiling drape behind the stage adds drama—and absorbs sound. Not that we’re complaining, darling.
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